goaliehabsfan - (Rob)

Member since December 15, 2013

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  • Comment on Liveblog: Ottawa draws first blood in meaningless weekend series (2014-10-04 09:04:10)
    " as long as they don´t go up against the opponent´s goon which won´t happen, all is well" That's exactly what DID happen. They were lucky to both come out of it unscathed. As far as not engaging, Patches didn't even drop his gloves. But still was on the wrong end of several of Neil's punches. Something needs to be done to address this, or we may have trouble making the playoffs.
  • Comment on Liveblog: Ottawa draws first blood in meaningless weekend series (2014-10-04 08:54:25)
    If you check the replay, max didn't drop his gloves, that didn't stop Him from eating some punches from Neil.
  • Comment on Liveblog: Ottawa draws first blood in meaningless weekend series (2014-10-04 03:32:31)
    A couple of issues with this post. First, I'm sure you're big and strong, but I sincerely doubt that you are stronger than everyone on the Habs. Unless you have been a pro athlete, or spent time with one while they train, you have no idea what kind of strength these guys actually posess. Second and more importantly, I take issue with your argument that not letting cheap shots "get to you" is somehow going to make them go away. Ask Marc Savard if he would be in a better position if he hadn't let that cheap shot "get to him". When chara broke patches' neck, the Habs didn't respond with anything more than some trash talk. Patches still had a broken though. It's really too bad that Steve Moore let Bertuzzi "get to him". The point here is that simply ignoring things that upset you like we can do in our lives, doesn't have the same effect when you're playing professional hockey in its current state. Like it or not, this is the way the league is right now, and we need to be able to adapt to the current situation.
  • Comment on Game Within the Game: Habs’ Galchenyuk at centre (2014-09-30 12:50:23)
    There will be injuries, illnesses, and slumps along the way. That line up is in an ideal situation with everyone healthy and playing well. This is a rarity as the season rolls on. If we are playing a team with a history of trying to intimidate the Habs I may sit Manny for a night, move Prust to center, and put the heavyweight on the wing.
  • Comment on Game Within the Game: Habs’ Galchenyuk at centre (2014-09-30 11:22:38)
    He had a roster spot...
  • Comment on Game Within the Game: Habs’ Galchenyuk at centre (2014-09-30 11:06:59)
    We had Parros and were useful well into May.
  • Comment on Game Within the Game: Habs’ Galchenyuk at centre (2014-09-30 11:03:22)
    The difference is that last year Orr was fighting Parros, instead of a concussing a top 9 guy. There was another game against Ottawa when Smith was running around trying to do some head hunting, Parros came out had some words with him, and that was the end of it, later in the same game Neil was starting up with his garbage, again Parros came out and the refs kicked them both out of the game before a fight started off a face-off. Without Parros in the lineup, both of them could have continued with their antics unchecked, and who knows what would have happened. I don't see anyone on our roster right now who can have a similar effect.
  • Comment on Game Within the Game: Habs’ Galchenyuk at centre (2014-09-29 22:28:35)
    I agree with the sentiment of your position, and I'm not a big fan of kids fighting on the ice, but I do support it in the NHL. The thing that would worry me about this scenario are the potential unintended consequences that may arise. Young players coming into the league would have no experience with fighting, and would end up squaring off with an opponent who could have 10 years of experience in dropping the gloves. I think that can lead to some pretty dangerous situations. Fighting is a skill that requires technique and practice, a kid with neither of these being put up against a vet is going to be in a bad place.
  • Comment on Habs’ top pick Scherbak shines in Bell Centre debut (2014-09-23 15:57:29)
    The aerobic system is still vital to hockey players as they have to do repeated sprints. The more repeats (i.e. shifts) the larger the role played by the aerobic system. It is also hugely important in terms of the athletes ability to recover between games, practices, and training sessions. They absolutely require a large aerobic base and a high VO2max. The issue with cycling for hockey players is the mechanics. I talked about the lack of transfer and issues with correcting muscle imbalances earlier. There is also the fact that to change directions doing bike sprints, you don't use your lower body to decelerate, whereas with running and skating there is a huge eccentric contraction of the active muscles in the lower body in order to stop from a sprint, and then a very explosive concentric contraction to accelerate in another direction. This is not possible or practical to recreate on a bike. That's why I said earlier the only beneficial place for cycling in a sprinting sport is in early aerobic base training, when the adaptations occur primarily at the heart.
  • Comment on Habs’ top pick Scherbak shines in Bell Centre debut (2014-09-23 13:28:53)
    The reason people find it difficult is due to the specificity I mentioned earlier. If you don't train for cycling, it will be difficult. The issue is the lack of transfer. The biomechanics are different and you can increase your VO2max on a bike, without it carrying over to a high VO2max on the ice. Bike sprints do not come close to replicating skating sprints as the muscles are recruited differently. The only place cycling would have a benefit beyond general populations or sports that involve cycling is for energy system development early in a training plan when the goal is central adaptations. The reason this is contraindicated for hockey players is that this is the same time that most of the efforts in the gym is directed towards reversing the imbalances that come with being in constant flexion as seen with hockey. Throwing the athlete back into an activity that is flexion dominant is counterproductive for the main goal of that training phase. I'm not saying cycling isn't a good exercise, all exercises are good, but when to apply it is the key. When it comes to elite level athletes, there are a lot of things to consider when it comes to exercise selection, and it's imperative to be using the right tool for the job.