myron.selby - (Myron Selby)

Member since March 23, 2011

Edmonton

Habs fan since: 1975
Favorite current player: Markov
All-time favorite player:

Signature:

Recent Comments

  • Comment on Habs will retire Guy Lapointe’s No. 5 on Nov. 8 at Bell Centre (2014-09-12 18:28:39)
    It was what Chris was saying about nationalism and patriotism I was responding to, not anthems. As for patriotism and pride in your country, I just don't see why anyone should identify with something as ephemeral and artificial as national boundaries. I have as much in common with someone from Russia or France or Venezuela as I do with someone else from Canada. And if I did subscribe to some form of national identification, I would be mortified by Canada's role in the world since Harper came into office. We now have the honor of being more warlike and right wing than the US government. Harper froths at the mouth in good Pavlovian fashion at every lie put forth by his master in Washington. His unilateral support for the Israeli dispossession and ongoing attempts at genocide of the Palestinians, his support for a coup government in Ukraine that include a neo-nazi party openly calling for the extermination of Jews and Russian speakers is so one-sided and wrong-headed it's painful. If I was a patriot, I'd be hanging my head in shame. But fortunately, I'm not. I'm a Canadian by happenstance, the only categorization I willingly subscribe to is human. For sure there are harmless and positive things that can come from patriotism. Unfortunately, it is far too easy to play on those emotions and identifications to whip up jingoism and create war fervor. It happens constantly. And btw - your assumption that everyone knows these things is simply wrong. For sure some do. But I would guess that the majority have never been exposed to information from anything but official sources (i.e. the mainstream media).
  • Comment on Habs will retire Guy Lapointe’s No. 5 on Nov. 8 at Bell Centre (2014-09-12 17:41:08)
    Let me see if I can explain this. The reason for the quote is because the Nazis were one of the first countries (actually they borrowed it from the US where a PR person first laid out the principles) to study and make extensive use of propaganda to get their populace to support wars of aggression. They did exactly what he describes in this quote to get support. At the time the majority of the german people were firmly convinced that they were defending themselves from their neighbors and were completely justified in everything they did. Just as the US (and to a lesser extent) the Canadian populations were firmly convinced that they were justified in invading (or setting up the overthrow of) Afghanistan, Iraq, Lybia, Syria and the democratically elected governments in Egypt and Ukraine. We are always the good guys and "they" are always the bad guys. What would astonish most people is that the populace in all those places we attack are just as firmly convinced that they are in the right. And it is all down to the carefully created lies that we are fed by our governments/major media. And it doesn't matter how often the grounds for attack are proved to be outright lies (the babies being killed in incubators in Kuwait, the disappearing WMD in Iraq, the non-existent nuclear bombs in Iran) we all line up to swallow the next big lie (another quote from a Nazi).
  • Comment on Habs will retire Guy Lapointe’s No. 5 on Nov. 8 at Bell Centre (2014-09-12 16:19:35)
    I was too late to comment on the whole nationalism/patriotism debate on the previous thread, so I wanted to put in my 2 cents worth now. I have to agree with Chris on this one. Nationalism is a scam that elites/leaders use to get people to go along with things that are against their own best interests. It's a cheap trick played on everyone. It takes something that seems positive (love of country) and uses it to promote wars against some imaginary "other". Somehow people can be convinced over and over again that some other people - who in actual fact are exactly like them - are some horrible enemy deserving of whatever hell can be visited on them. My favourite explanation of what patriotism is used for comes from the transcript of a Herman Goring interview when he was in jail during the Nuremberg trials: Göring: Why, of course, the people don't want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship. Gilbert: There is one difference. In a democracy, the people have some say in the matter through their elected representatives, and in the United States only Congress can declare wars. Göring: Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.
  • Comment on Odds against a Habs rookie cracking lineup this season (2014-09-12 15:57:36)
    What he said. Damn it's nice to feel I'm not totally alone on this one. As far as I'm concerned nationalism is a cheap trick designed to get people to support things that are clearly not in their best interests. What difference does it make which side of some totally imaginary line (which in many places gets moved on a regular basis) you live on? It's just one more tool the elites use to get their sheep - I mean citizens - to support wars against other hapless groups of people. Patriotism is always the go-to argument for wars. This is the transcript of a conversation with Herman Goring in jail during the Nuremberg trials: Göring: Why, of course, the people don't want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship. Gilbert: There is one difference. In a democracy, the people have some say in the matter through their elected representatives, and in the United States only Congress can declare wars. Göring: Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.
  • Comment on Odds against a Habs rookie cracking lineup this season (2014-09-11 18:16:05)
    I still remember when Keane joked (after the previous few captains had been traded) that the "C" stood for "C" you later. I'm not sure whether that was before or after he was made captain, but it certainly proved prophetic.
  • Comment on AUDIO: Former Habs captain Saku Koivu announces his retirement (2014-09-11 11:43:10)
    @Marc10 - I have to disagree with your statement that Montreal didn't do Koivu any favors by not getting a 1st line centre for him to play behind. Koivu was a true first line centre and would have played there on most teams at the time. When Koivu went down with his knee injury, he had just tied Selanne for the league scoring lead (32 points in 25 games I think). He was playing amazing hockey - fast, shifty and able to make plays at top speed. What did Koivu in was 2 things - injuries and lack of top wingers to play with. He had the talent and the drive to be a #1 without question.
  • Comment on AUDIO: Former Habs captain Saku Koivu announces his retirement (2014-09-10 16:57:05)
    Funny, that Max is so adamant about wanting to play with him if he's as useless as you seem to think. I would also argue that DD is a better setup man than any of our other centers. Galchenyuk will eventually be better but not until he gets to the point where they trust him to play the position. I fully expect him to take a huge step forward this year, at which point we'll see if he becomes a full time center. Until then DD is by far the best option to play with Max. I love Eller and think that he will become a very good center for us at some point. But he and Max just don't think on the same wavelength. Plekanec is not really a setup man and is more concerned with playing a good 2 way game. So until AG is ready, DD is the best option available.
  • Comment on AUDIO: Former Habs captain Saku Koivu announces his retirement (2014-09-10 15:28:22)
    If you had to pick between beating a dead horse to death and being a tiresome one trick pony ... which would you pick?
  • Comment on AUDIO: Former Habs captain Saku Koivu announces his retirement (2014-09-10 15:23:35)
    Max didn't need any help to suck in the last part of the playoffs. If I remember correctly he didn't even have a shot attempt in the last game (thus Guy Lafleur's comments). To blame his lack of effort on DD, who worked his tail off, you would have to be either blind or in complete denial. All due respect of course ......
  • Comment on Clearing up the Habs’ TV picture (2014-09-04 16:31:46)
    I don't think this french package is available by simply using your existing RDS (which I cancelled anyway). I think you have to buy it separately as the french Center Ice package. My question is, will this be the RDS HD or vanilla RDS?