Fond farewell to sportswriting legend

Milt Dunnell turned 100 on Christmas Eve, 2005.
Courtesy Richard Lautens, Toronto Star

Toronto sportswriting legend Milt Dunnell – a legend well beyond that city’s borders, in fact – died in his sleep last night at the age of 102.

Mr. Dunnell was born four years before the Canadiens, a dozen years before the National Hockey League. He covered more than his share of Habs games, once the Habs came into being, and was a respected, respectful voice for at least a few generations of readers.

We send our condolences to those close to Mr. Dunnell, and wish the master craftsman well where he is this morning, a fine collection of athletes and stories for him to cover anew.

Don’t miss this wonderful tribute by Dave Perkins in today’s Toronto Star, and a photo gallery here.

4 Comments

  1. earl says:

    Is Richard Lautens any relation to the late Gary Lautens, another favourite writer of mine?

    Bye Milt, you were one in a million. Great writer, great humour.

    I can just imagine a conversation with a man who has viewed the world for a full century. Two world wars and a world that morphed before his very eyes.

  2. 24 Cups says:

    There is another wonderful tribute to Milt Dunnell in today’s Star written by Warren Gerard and Randy Starkman.

    http://www.thestar.com/sports

    The Original 24 Cups

  3. Sulemaan says:

    A classy writer and one of the reasons I enjoyed reading the Toronto Star.

  4. 24 Cups says:

    Thank you Dave for acknowledging this great man. I have lived in the greater Toronto area for my entire life. I’ve read The Toronto Star every day since I was a little boy. Of course, one always starts with the sports section. Years ago, newsprint was the main form of communication – long before the internet and 24 hour news stations on television. It was the golden era of newspapers. We followed the daily events of sports and the careers of our heroes by reading the paper each day. The Star would put out three editions a day and Milt Dunnell was the head honcho of the sports department. A consummate writer who had a wicked sense of houmour and a love of the ponies. Professional in every aspect of the word. A man who over time grew into a legend on the Toronto sports scene. Thanks for all the great memories Milt – we all tip our fedoras in your memory.

    The Original 24 Cups


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