1993 Stanley Cup flashback: Habs win Game 2 thanks to McSorley’s stick

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Canadiens’ last Stanley Cup championship.

The Canadiens were trailing the best-of-seven Stanley Cup final 1-0 heading into Game 2 against the Los Angeles Kings on June 3, 1993. Marty McSorley’s illegal stick proved costly for the Kings as the Canadiens rallied for a 3-2 overtime victory to even the series 1-1.

Below are the columns by Michael Farber and Red Fisher that were published in The Gazette following that game.

The photo of the Game 2 ticket above is courtesy of Erle Schneidman, who has a website CanadiensMemorialia.com. It’s interesting to note that the cost of the ticket, in the centre Reds at the Forum, was $56.

McSorley stick call recalls Cherry’s blunder

PUBLISHED IN THE GAZETTE ON JUNE 4, 1993

MICHAEL FARBER
THE GAZETTE

The Canadiens were about to march to death row last night when in a reversal worthy of Perry Mason, they threw the book – the rulebook – at the Los Angeles Kings.

Check the stick.

Get away with murder.

Eric Desjardins 3, Los Angeles Kings 2 in overtime.

The Christian 20-20 Excel model used by Marty McSorley will go down in Canadiens’ lore right next to Don Cherry’s first math book because he couldn’t count to six either in 1979. The illegal stick was the inanimate equivalent of Stan Jonathan, the extra man on the ice 14 years ago when Guy Lafleur sent the game into overtime and the Boston Bruins threw away a trip to the Stanley Cup finals in a Game 7 at the Forum.

Before we move into the bureau of weights and measures, it is worth remembering that the Bruins were two minutes from ending the Canadiens’ string of Stanley Cups at three when Boston staged a Chinese fire drill on the ice. The Canadiens won in overtime, they went on to beat the New York Rangers in the final, and Grapes became a rich man. Sort of everyone won.

OK, so a Game 2 isn’t quite as immediate as all that, but for the Canadiens, it might as well have been Game 7. There was an overpowering temptation in the third period when the score was 1-1 to say, “Next goal wins the Stanley Cup.”

If Montreal had flown into Los Angeles today down 2-0, it would have been an almost impossible Lotus Land position from which to extract itself. The Canadiens had to take one on home ice, and when it came to crunch time, they had to lay on the lumber.

The Canadiens beat the murder rap on a technicality, as if referee Kerry Fraser had not read them their Miranda rights or something. The stick call is not exactly the purist’s way of winning a game. These used to be the Flying Frenchmen, not the Measuring Montrealers. But it certainly wasn’t a cheap trick. Not at all. There is nothing cheap about the playoffs – not the ticket prices, not the price of a victory. If the red-white-blue needs to help to avoid the noose, it is time to turn to a little black and white. Rule 20B. After No. 28, Eric Desjardins, it was the absolute best number the Canadiens had going for them.

Guy Carbonneau spotted the stick. He says he noticed McSorley’s outsized curve in Game 1. Captain Carbo is attentive to detail and no doubt has excellent vision. He might even have 20-20 foresight because McSorley said he received the batch of sticks he was using only yesterday.

Someone is not coming clean here.

But then, illegal sticks are hockey’s dirty little secret. It’s like cheating on taxes. You have known it done. During the Buffalo series, one of the Canadiens took a visitor on a walking tour of his own team’s stick rack and observed “Legal, illegal, illegal …” until he had eyeballed enough illicit wood to keep Fraser’s already excited whistle in constant heat. This is how the game is played. The illegal stick is no different than the scuffball in baseball or holding in football.

As Denis Savard – one of the stick spotters who spent the night behind the bench – observed, “We’re not talking about stuff that anyone goes to jail for. If you cheat, you have to be smart enough not to get caught. You cheat because you think it’s going to make you a better player, and maybe Marty decided that stick made him a better player. I’m sure every team in this league has four or five guys who use illegal sticks. It’s all a question of timing.”

When to call it and when to change sticks.

Obviously, the Canadiens were going to wait until they had no choice because a stick call is the last call. It is desperate in the extreme, something done in the last two minutes. That explains why there is a flurry of exchanges with the equipment men in the last five minutes, which is like ditching the receipts before customs. Just in case.

Indeed, the Canadiens knew they had two sure choices for a stick measurement – McSorley and Luc Robitaille.

“Yeah,” Carbonneau said, “until the other guy changed his stick with four minutes to go.”

“Didn’t happen,” Robitaille said. “The only time I ever change my stick is when it’s broken.”

Sure. As if Robitaille is going to scream that all his sticks have a curve like Kelly Ireland and that he is always keeping one step ahead of the law.

Jacques Demers said he hated to do it to a player he respects like McSorley – he looked uh, terribly broken up about it – but the Canadiens were desperate, trailing 2-1 with 1:45 left in regulation. When asked if he would have tried the same gambit, Melrose said, “No, because I don’t believe in winning that way.”

Maybe Melrose didn’t learn all that much when he played for Demers in Cincinnati.

“That’s not a cheap call,” managing director Serge Savard said. “That’s an excellent decision by Jacques. You’re not allowed to play with an illegal stick.”

Did you ever?

“Me,” said Savard, the molasses defenceman. “Why would I ever have to?”

Savard was on the team that was saved by the Bruins’ inability to learn the lessons of Sesame Street, and he stole another one because of an out-of-the-mainsteam penalty. His math is excellent. Instead of the Canadiens needing three games to get ahead, it only takes one.

The series is tied because Carbonneau didn’t miss an old trick and McSorley did. It is part of the Canadiens lore, enough to make an outsider believe in spooks.

This was one for the books. Rule 20B.

Cup now a best-of-five series

PUBLISHED IN THE GAZETTE ON JUNE 4, 1993

RED FISHER
THE GAZETTE

Eric Desjardins had that feeling, he was saying. Feeling good about everything, that is.

“You feel good because you know you’re in the game,” he said in the moments after his tying goal with 1:13 left in regulation – and the winner 51 seconds into the overtime – provided the Canadiens with a must-win, 3-2 victory over the Los Angeles Kings.

Desjardins was feeling good but the Canadiens, as a team, were feeling great because what this eighth victory in nine overtime games does is lock up the Stanley Cup final with the Kings, 1-1. Games 3 and 4 are in Los Angeles tomorrow and Monday.

A lot of games have been played in these playoffs, with at least three more remaining, but none has or is likely to have as bizarre a finish as this one.

There were the Canadiens, trailing 2-1 on a night when they surely came to play. Desjardins had scored the only goal of the first period, Dave Taylor the only one in the second – shorthanded. Pat Conacher’s goal midway through the third had lifted the Kings into the lead, at which point there was ample reason to believe they would leave the city with a 2-0 lead in the series.

Fewer than two minutes remained when coach Jacques Demers pulled a rabbit out of his Canadiens cap.

What the kindly ol’ coach did was call for a measurement of Marty McSorley’s stick – a gamble at best. If you’re right, McSorley is out. Wrong – and a Canadiens player is dispatched to the penalty box.

Demers was right, and with Patrick Roy yanked for an extra attacker, Desjardins scored his second goal of the game with a rising shot from the blue line.

He made it three with his overtime winner – and ain’t life grand?

“I tried too hard on my first shot,” he said of his winner. “I had all my weight on it. I got it back … ”

He got it from Benoit Brunet, and there was no mistake on his second shot. The Canadiens’ 41st shot (the Kings had 24) beat Kelly Hrudey cleanly.

“Like I was saying,” said Desjardins, “you feel good, but you don’t know you’re going to score.

“Desjardins,” said a smiling Serge Savard, “had one of those dream nights, but he’s been playing very well since the start of the playoffs – especially against Quebec. Tonight, well, what can you say about a guy who scores all the goals in a 3-2 win. What I can say is that Guy Carbonneau probably played his best game of the season.”

What Savard could have added was that his Canadiens, an embarrassment in Game 1, lifted their game several levels on this night. Not completely, when it’s considered that coach Demers was so unhappy with Brian Bellows that he benched him for the entire second period. More than enough of them came to play, however.

Forty-eight hours earlier, this Canadiens gang which couldn’t shoot straight looked like a team which needed a jump-start in a hurry. There was nobody around to get the job done. Not a volunteer in sight.

They stuttered and struggled their way through three periods – except for perhaps eight or nine minutes at the start of the second period. They were uninterested. Hardly anyone among them, aside from Patrick Roy, could look into the mirror and deliver a thumbs up.

Now, here it is two nights later, and the jumping started at the start. They needed a 16th shot in the first period before Desjardins’s shot from the blue line hissed between Hrudey’s legs. The names and bodies were the same, but the intensity and work ethic were sky-high.

The first period was one in which the Canadiens outshot the Kings 16-5, and while many of their first 15 didn’t test Hrudey too severely, what mattered is that on this night, the Canadiens had arrived at the arena clutching their lunch pails.

They came in waves. They hit. Early in the period, in a 51-second span, Kirk Muller, Mathieu Schneider and Desjardins thundered into Wayne Gretzky.

It wasn’t a matter of “getting” the Great One. Mostly, it was a case of letting the Kings know that hey, we messed up in Game 1, but this is another night so let’s get it on.

There was nothing soft about their game. Vincent Damphousse brought everything he had to the arena. So did Muller and Keane. Bellows?

“I didn’t think Brian Bellows was giving me Brian Bellows hockey,” said Demers with a grunt.

“I took the criticism constructively,” replied Bellows. “I worked out on the bike between the second and third period. I played in the third.”

The 28-14 margin in shots the Canadiens enjoyed going into the third period would seem to indicate that Hrudey had to be on top of his game to keep his colleagues alive. He had his moments, but the reality is that he wasn’t tested as severely as the numbers showed. Not nearly enough – except by Desjardins, who had both of the overtime shots.

There was also Carbonneau who, as Savard said, played his best game. He did a man-sized job defensively. When the Canadiens were left short for 61 seconds early in the third, Carbonneau helped hold off the explosive Kings – and almost scored on a partial breakaway.

“I was being hooked going in,” said Carbonneau. “I couldn’t get as much on the shot as I would have liked.

“Know something?” Carbonneau asked. “I’m glad Desjardins did.”

Illegal sticks are common in NHL

PUBLISHED IN THE GAZETTE ON JUNE 4, 1993

RED FISHER
THE GAZETTE

The illegal curve on Marty McSorley’s stick which landed the Los Angeles defenceman in the penalty box and, by extension, led directly to the Canadiens’ 3-2 overtime victory, is an old story in the National Hockey League.

Put it this way: there are players on every team, including the Canadiens, using them. The trick, though, is to switch back to the legal sticks with no more than five minutes remaining in the game.

McSorley, obviously, forgot.

Or, as he put it in the moments after Eric Desjardins’s overtime goal: “I usually put one stick in the rack that I know is good, but I guess I got caught up in the emotion of the game and I picked out the wrong one.”

He forgot – and by forgetting, he allowed the Canadiens back into a Stanley Cup final which appeared to be slipping out of their grasp.

Players don’t talk about the illegal hook on their sticks. It’s against the rules, right?

So:

“There’s nobody on our team who uses an illegal stick,” Guy Carbonneau said. (Was that a wink?)

Since they’re illegal, why do players use them?

It’s the big shot theory, of course. The bigger the hook, the better the shot. Boom! Boom!

It’s why, as McSorley admitted, there’s only one stick belonging to him that he knows is good. It’s why trainers’ trunks are filled with sticks which can’t stand the measurement of constituted authority.

The Canadiens, for example, were quite prepared to measure Luc Robitaille’s stick instead of McSorley’s. Tomorrow, it could be that Barry Melrose will want a look at Vincent Damphousse’s stick.

“I’d love to use an illegal stick,” Kirk Muller said. “I’d love to go out there and let go with those big, booming shots. It’s against the rules, though, just like hooking and tripping.

“All of us know there are players everywhere who have them,” Muller added. “We also know they’ll go back to their good ones when there’s only five minutes left in the game – depending on the score, of course.”

Do any of the Canadiens use illegal sticks?

“I think when you go in the playoffs, it is something you have to look at,” Desjardins said. “You know a player has an illegal stick, but you are nervous when you make the call. I think when you are in the playoffs, everyone should have a legal stick.

“It played for us,” Desjardins added. “It could have played against us.”

 

146 Comments

  1. Maritime Ron says:

    So, Carey Price’s goaltender Coach Pierre Groulx lost his job today.
    He had been there since July 9th, 2009 – or the 09/10 season….

    Groulx did not have an NHL player/goaltender pedigree and perhaps that is what Carey needs at this point in time!

    Francois Allaire( never played…) whose supposed claim to fame was Patrick Roy, almost destroyed Leafs goalie James Reimer ..the same Reimer that finished with great stats this year under the tutelage of Rick St. Croix – a guy that actually played..

    Jonathan Quick and Jonathan Bernier in LA?
    They have had Bill Randford as goaltending coach, who has become an outstanding goalie coach to the point of recommending unique skate sharpening for better lateral movement. He played the game!

    * For all those with the Carey Price trade scenarios, Price is going nowhere for at least 2 years.
    – He has unfinished business, and there is a belief that it is in Montreal.
    – His past performance would bring little back.
    – His $6.5M Cap Hit, with a huge Cap Decrease coming, would be uninviting for at least 2 years until it moved north..

  2. Chris says:

    I honestly couldn’t care less if a player changed teams to win a Stanley Cup, regardless if they played the whole season or join the team as a ‘rental’.

    A player should be judged on one thing: how did they play the game? Using team success or lack thereof as a defining metric is just lazy thinking. Saku Koivu was a heck of a hockey player. That he has no Stanley Cups isn’t really on him: he almost always upped his level of play in the playoffs and his career numbers for a crappy team (0.24 GPG, 0.87 PPG) compare well with current stars such as Pavel Datsyuk (0.26 GPG, 0.74 PPG), Jonathan Toews (0.27 GPG, 0.86 PPG) or Patrik Elias (0.28 GPG, 0.77 PPG). The sole difference were that their teams allowed them to continue producing deep into the playoffs, while Koivu had to go home each year because his teammates wet the bed while he was laying it all out on the ice.

    There are a host of excellent NHL players that are either in the Hall of Fame, will be someday, or are on the bubble, but that never won the Stanley Cup: Mats Sundin, Keith Tkachuk, Paul Kariya, Adam Oates, Pat Lafontaine, Eric Lindros, Pavel Bure, John Vanbiesbrouck, Cam Neely, Brian Propp, Peter Stastny, Mark Howe, Michel Goulet, Dale Hawerchuk, Marcel Dionne, Rod Gilbert, Borje Salming, Gilbert Perreault, Brad Park, Jean Ratelle, and Norm Ullman. Brian Propp and Norm Ullman were particularly unlucky, losing in the Stanley Cup Finals 5 times each!

    Not winning the Stanley Cup should never, ever diminish how great these players were. Adding a Stanley Cup late in their career with a different team, as was done by Ray Bourque, would not make any of these players better. But nor does it make those players that do change teams a “douche”.

    Hockey players are loyal to their contract, at which point they move on or stay. That is their prerogative. I find it funny that anybody could hold moving to a new team to win a Stanley Cup against a player like Jarome Iginla. His rights were owned by the Calgary Flames until he was 27 years old. He then stayed loyal to them for another 10 years. They essentially had almost two decades to win a Stanley Cup and largely squandered it through horrific drafting and mismangagement.

    Iginla is going for a Stanley Cup with the Penguins, but I am willing to bet he would have been happy to stay in Calgary had it not been for the incessant questions about his status and the nudging by management to waive his NTC so they could start rebuilding. The disloyalty there was from Flames management and fans, not Iginla. If he follows in Ray Bourque’s footsteps, I will be ecstatic…I’m pulling for the Penguins in this year’s playoffs solely because of Jarome Iginla. He has given so much to the Calgary Flames, Team Canada and hockey fans in general, so I would love to see one of the games truly “good guys” get his just reward (and yes, I realize he has been paid handsomely for what he has given).

    • Mattyleg says:

      I love Iginla too, I’ve always admired him, but I think what he did smacks of desperation.

      And I don’t think that being given a Cup with a bunch of strangers is a great ‘reward’. I wonder if it will feel as good for him in the long run as he thinks it will.

      It’s like not being able to finish a videogame yourself, getting your son to get you to the last boss, and letting you kill him. Kind of an empty victory, in my mind.

      —Hope Springs Eternal—

      • Maritime Ron says:

        My 12:58 post

        Mattyleg wrote:

        “….. I have to reiterate that I dislike the idea of a player moving teams so that ‘he’ can win a cup…Stick with the team you’re on, and don’t go chasing that personal goal in a team sport…..Run to a team to try to get a Cup and I think you’re a douche. Doesn’t matter who you are.”
        ————–

        No disrespect of your opinion, yet there may be another way to look at people that chase ultimate goals in their respective professions – that were perhaps life time goals since childhood…and it may be difficult to consider Jarome Iginla or Ray Bourque as…”Douch*s”

        Jarome Iginla chose to be traded to Pittsburgh instead of Boston, obviously because he felt he had a better chance to win a Stanley Cup. (Right choice? Who knows, we’ll see…)

        Did he do it for the Money?
        Iginla’s Career Earnings now stand at $69,025,000 and counting.
        http://www.hockeyzoneplus.com/salaries/1700

        Playing almost 2 more months of tough, brutal playoff hockey brings “Relative” small financial rewards to the winners and even the 1st Round losers.

        *The new 2013 CBA has DOUBLED the money for player’s playoff shares.

        This year, and assuming there will be 25 Shares to be divided, here is what each player will earn above his Contract Salary that is only paid during the season: (no typos here)
        1st Round losers: $10K
        2nd Round losers: $20K
        3rd Round losers: $50K
        Cup Finalist: $90K
        Cup Winner: $150K
        http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/bonus-money-adds-incentive-to-nhl-playoffs/

        As for Ray Bourque, he had little to prove, and if he had retired at the age of 39 before moving on to Colorado, he was still going to be a 1st Ballot Hall of Fame selection:
        - Fourth most Norris Trophy wins with 5, behind only the great Bobby Orr with 8 consecutive wins, and all time great Hab Doug Harvey and Nicky Lindstrom with 7 each.
        - 13 times on the 1st All Star Team – 6 times on the 2nd, and so much more…

        I don’t know If Bourque needed the money, yet his NHL contract career earnings only show a total of $32M with that last year at Colorado at $5.5M.

        Perhaps Bourque had an incredible and burning desire to win a Cup – to hoist in front of family and friends – to accomplish a life time goal being a Quebecois and watching the almost yearly Cup Parades – to be part of a Winner, yet more importantly, to be an INTEGRAL part of that Stanley Cup win.

        Was he?
        21 games played, 4 goals, 10 points, +9… which was 2nd best on the team and best for all Colorado Dmen, and an average of 28:32 minutes played per game….and perhaps the reason why Captain Joe Sakic passed the Cup to him first – even before Patrick Roy had a chance to hoist it a 2nd time with the Avalanche.
        That says a lot about Raymond Bourque!

        • Mattyleg says:

          I tried to respond to this below, M-Ron, but something happened to my connection.

          I never said they were in it for the money.
          They’re in it for the glory.

          —Hope Springs Eternal—

      • ed says:

        There`s no desperation is wanting to “culminate“ one`s career by achieving his ultimate goal.

        Iginla is contributing with every shift he plays for Pittsburgh.

        He`s not handing over the controls to anyone and watching as they win something on his behalf.

        His contribution to the Pens` playoff run is felt big time by him and by all of his teammates.

        • Mattyleg says:

          I’m not saying that he’s not contributing.
          Yes, he is, he’s helping beat the final bad-guy.
          He didn’t help the team get there, or get home-ice advantage, etc.

          —Hope Springs Eternal—

          • ed says:

            the playoff run is something totally special and unique, and every player dreams of contributing towards a Cup run.

            that far and away overrides helping them get there or get home ice advantage.

      • The Jackal says:

        Love the video game analogy Matty, but I don’t think this particular one applies to the Iggy situation.

        His situation is more like he is a very good player, but the rest of teammates were noobs. Once he joined a team with better players, he was able to use his skills to help that team win, even if there were already good players on it.

        IMO, when an athlete wins a championship they are pretty ecstatic about it and being part of a different team probably doesn’t diminish the experience.

        ______________________
        Hockey sine stercore tauri.

  3. HabFanSince72 says:

    Groulx never bothered teaching Price how to stop unscreened wrist shots from just inside the blue line. Had to go.

    • Habfan17 says:

      I also hate that pad slide he always does. It seems he always drops to his pads and plays ” slide across the crease” It would seem to me that this manouver of his, however cool he thinks it looks, makes it harder for him to react when the puck changes direction or the shooter aims for the top of the net

      Habfan17

  4. The Jackal says:

    All goalie experts out again. HIO at its best :D

    When will Price elevate his game? Have you chosen to ignore those instances to make a questionable point?

    He changed his technique and deviated from what makes him successful, and even so, according to real experts, had 3/4 of a season at Vezina level. A coach that can help Price stayed focus and find his best game will only help.

    • Cal says:

      Thus far, Price has been a bust, especially when you consider he was taken at #5. He’s not done anything at playoff time to make me change my mind and his regular season this year was good to mediocre. MB may not be as patient as everyone else has been.

      • Mattyleg says:

        I just hope that whoever they get in encourages Price to be more aggressive.

        That’s what he needs to hear.

        —Hope Springs Eternal—

      • The Jackal says:

        He has not been a bust. He was good last season and in the playoffs of 2011. He was very good this season until the slump. Apparently Price is the disappointment but the team is not? That doesn’t make sense. Many times, Price has been the bright spot on a mediocre team. This season is the first time in his career with the Habs that he has not had to carry the team.

        Granted, he had a bad final stretch, but who hasn’t?
        He is very young and will continue to learn and get better.

        ______________________
        Hockey sine stercore tauri.

  5. HabFanSince72 says:

    Even if you call Bourque a douche for going to another team it’s still an immense step up from Boston Bruin.

  6. Plekasuares says:

    Habs will not renew the contract of goaltending coach pierre groulx thoughts?

    • habsfan0 says:

      It was either Groulx or Price that had to go.

      Getting rid of the goaltending coach basically saves face of the organization.

      Having said that, I’ve always maintained that Price’s problems are almost all between the ears. Unfortunately,he’s always maintained that he’s “comfortable” with Groulx,so it’s debatable whether another coach who he’s not as “comfortable” with will bring out the best in him.

      • Habfan17 says:

        I don’t remember which ex NHL goalie Price was training with, but he played much better when he was working with him. Does anyone remember who it was? If my memory serves me, he was coaching him when he was in junior. Maybe he is available. I never understood having someone who has never played goalie and only uses video, being the goalie coach.

        Habfan17

  7. bwoar says:

    RE: Bourque’s Cup, Iginla, etc.
    It’s a shame that our older ‘values’ just aren’t held up in today’s NHL, but then, where exactly are they held up? I’ll put it right out there: NHL hockey is much more an entertainment business enterprise than it is a team sport. If you want to call guys names for pursuing their career goals within that environment, that’s kinda weak.

    Ever see the Disney cartoon “Tangled”? There’s a great number in it called “I’ve Got A Dream”, full of guys who look like they might be hockey players. I think there’s something much more wrong with the people who say, “hey, I could pursue my dream, but, nah. That wouldn’t be loyal to my owner. Or to the fanbase, especially the fans who love me one minute and throw me under the bus the next.”

    I think any players with that in their heads are perfectly crazy. Moreover, I think ANYONE who lets their life slip away, while their dream just hangs up there on the shelf, is wasting perfectly good food, oxygen and energy products. The definition of a mindless consumer of things.

    Imagine a guy who dreamt of playing for the Habs his whole life, never gets the chance, and finally as a UFA signs up – would you call that guy names? Probabaly not.

    “thoroughbred”

    • Mattyleg says:

      I’m a kinda weak person.

      It’s not surprising that people think the way you indicate, because we’re living in a society that (inexplicably) ever-increasingly favours the individual over the collective, which is why there is so much more selfishness in the world these days in general than there ever was before.

      Can I make millions of dollars at the expense of a few thousand exploited Third-World workers? My dream has always been to be a millionaire, so yes! Sounds great; where do I sign to realize my dream?

      Players don’t have to be loyal to their owner or their fans; players should be loyal to their team – those they play with, and the jersey they wear. Put yourself in the position of the player who has worked his ass off all year alongside his superstar captain who, before the trade deadline, lists two teams he thinks have a chance at winning the Cup who he will agree to be traded to. I think that player would feel pretty cheated, that the one man who has been preaching ‘team’ and ‘working for each other’ is now dumping them and scampering off like a dog after a bone.

      A player who goes to play for a team they’ve always wanted to play for when they are a UFA is not the same thing as a player who is desperately (and somewhat, in my opinion, pathetically) chasing a Stanley Cup ring.

      I’ve always wondered how a player feels lifting the Cup amongst a group of relative strangers, while their real team-mates sit at home and watch them on TV.

      —Hope Springs Eternal—

      • Chris says:

        Not to put too fine a point on it, but I find the line “we’re living in a society that (inexplicably) ever-increasingly favours the individual over the collective, which is why there is so much more selfishness in the world these days in general than there ever was before” to be complete nonsense.

        There is as much selfishness today as there ever was. Greed and selfishness are among the oldest and most base of human qualities…given an opportunity, they will flourish.

        Today’s society is no more selfish than societies of yesteryear. It just expresses itself in different ways.

        • Mattyleg says:

          No, that’s actually not true, Chris.

          The way in which people are encouraged by media messages to do things for themselves at the cost of the society to which they belong (be it micro or macro) has increased incredibly over the past 160 years. Where before, people had to rely upon one another to survive, and recognized the intrinsic roles they each played in the bigger picture of the health of their society, nowadays people are encouraged to ignore those around them. For many reasons.

          I’ve been doing extensive research in this area, and it’s pretty shocking. I can give you some things to read about the topic if you like.

          (it’s also why I’ve been a bit dour recently)

          —Hope Springs Eternal—

          • Chris says:

            160 years ago puts us back to the 1850′s, roughly around the time of the American Civil War.

            Here is some of the “unselfish” behaviour that was commonplace:

            1) It was largely okay to own slaves. Yes, we were so unselfish in those days that we actually viewed fellow human beings as chattel.

            2) Women did not have the right to vote. In many cases, they did not have the right to work. In science, many women had their work claimed by unselfish men from their field. Women were not quite slaves, but they weren’t far up the ladder in many meaningful ways.

            3) We won’t even talk about what rights were “enjoyed” by the gay/lesbian/transgendered community.

            4) Aboriginal populations were in the middle of an ethnic cleansing that remains one of the blackest marks in North American history.

            5) The 1850′s featured rampant colonialism by European powers, and expansion of North American lands into “empty” lands. What was the driving factor in this expansion, the lure for those settlers. Something to call their own. They didn’t “Go west, young man!” out of any great sense of community. They went west to find their riches.

            On and on it goes. If you look, life in 1850 was often nasty and brutish and I would argue that evil walked much more openly in many cases.

            In just about every measurable way, life is better in 2013 than it was in 1950, and light years better than it was in 1850. Selfishness is here, just as it always has been, but so is community and volunteerism.

            Perhaps you need to pursue some activities that renew your faith in your fellow humans, instead of seeking examples of how they are a disappointment. You will never fail to find the latter, but the former is out there in abundance. Unfortunately, it is not deemed worthy of telling in the media.

          • Old Bald Bird says:

            You are a smart man, Chris. Remind me never to get in an argument with you.

  8. Sportfan says:

    We all get annoyed at Refs and Umpires and these calls give us reason to get annoyed at the Umpires!

    http://lastwordonsports.com/2013/06/03/umps-under-fire-2013-in-major-league-baseball/

  9. Kooch7800 says:

    I KNEW IT – Marc Bergevin announced that the organization will not renew the contract of goaltending coach Pierre Groulx.

    http://canadiens.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=672862

    “Keep your stick on the Ice”

  10. Habfan17 says:

    Since it is impossible to know who will be available, I have put players I think may be available around the picks the Habs have. I have them in the order I would take them if they are available.
    First round,
    Anthony Mantha
    Rasmus Ristolainen
    Jacob De La Rose
    Frederik Gauthier

    Second round;
    Valentin Zykov
    J.T. Compher
    Dillon Heatherington
    Brett Pesce
    Hudson Fasching
    Zack Sanford

    Third round;
    Carl Dahlstrom
    Nick Baptiste
    John Hayden
    Mason Geertsen
    Remie Elie
    Mitchel Wheaton
    Ben Betkar
    Jared Hauf

    If the Habs could trade some surplus players like Weber for additional 3rd round or 4th round picks, this seems like a good draft to have those picks in. Even Gorges for a 2nd and a 3rd.

    Habfan17

    • 24 Cups says:

      I can’t see Mantha or Ristolainen falling to 25th. No way.

      Weber’s time is done here in Montreal. Diaz has basically pushed him out the door. The team doesn’t have a 4th or 5th round pick so Montreal needs to make a swap.

      If that happens, then Montreal will open the season without Emelin, Kaberle and Weber. They have three kids in Hamilton who may or may not be ready for prime time. I can’t see them moving Gorges.

      • Habfan17 says:

        Depending on which ranking you look at, they may be available. I am with you, I doubt it, but you never know. I just put the players who are ranked in and around each pick the Habs have and who I like. As far as Gorges goes, true Emelin will be out, however they do have enough players to fill in to start and there is always free agency. Pateryn, Tinordi and Beaulieu looked fine and it is great opportunity to see what they can do. There will still be Markov, Boullion, Diaz and Subban. That is good enough to start the season, especially since it looks like Tinordi will start the season with the Habs, Then there are dark horses like Nygren who is 22 already and has been playing in the top league in Sweden.

        Habfan17

  11. Stevie.Ray says:

    Marc Bergevin announced that the organization will not renew the contract of goaltending coach Pierre Groulx.

    Let the goalie coach sweepstakes begin.

  12. Fransaskois says:

    Pierre Groulx fired. Looks like we’re keeping Price. Thumbs up.

    Edit: Stevie.Ray’s right. Not fired, contract just wasn’t renewed.

    • Strummer says:

      We have too much invested in Price to give up on him so the status quo was not acceptable in coaching.

      Here’s hoping someone can step in and cure what’s ailing Pricer.

      ______________________________________________________
      “It’s just an opinion – I could be wrong”

  13. commandant says:

    Draft Combine, Heights and Weights, as best as I could come up with

    http://lastwordonsports.com/2013/06/03/nhl-draft-combine-2013-heights-and-weights/

    Go Habs Go!
    Your 2013 NHL Draft Headquarters, Now Open.
    http://lastwordonsports.com/

    • Stevie.Ray says:

      Thank you.

    • GrimJim says:

      Ben,
      You are probably the best on here who would know, except for maybe Stubbs or Hickey, but is there official word on whether the Habs have lost the rights to Pribyl or not? I looked on the Habs website, NHL.com, TSN and CBC on Sunday but there was nothing (of course it was a Sunday).

      • commandant says:

        As far as I know they have lost the rights to Pribyl and he re-enters the draft. I’m about 90% sure on this.

        The lingering 10% of doubt comes from the new CBA which says the team owns rights for euro draftees 4 years instead of 2 years now. I think that rule only applies to players drafted in 2013 and later, however there is a small chance it was grandfathered in to include 2011 and 2012. I haven’t seen the full text of the CBA online so I really don’t know.

        Most websites, like habsprospects, seem to be reporting that we have lost his rights… and I’m pretty sure they are correct, just not 100% on it.

        Go Habs Go!
        Your 2013 NHL Draft Headquarters, Now Open.
        http://lastwordonsports.com/

  14. NTTIAWWT says:

    The funniest part of Bourque’s Stanley Cup win/ring was him parading it, in Boston.

  15. Bripro says:

    I don’t see the problem with Ray Bourque changing teams.
    I’m convinced, as most here are as well I’m sure, that while in junior ranks, every kid dreams of holding the Stanley Cup overhead.
    He dedicated himself exclusively to the Bruins for two decades. When it was obvious that his time was nearing and they weren’t the team to bring the cup home, he made a choice.
    Most great things in your life won’t happen by chance, they will happen by choice.

  16. Maritime Ron says:

    Mattyleg wrote:

    “….. I have to reiterate that I dislike the idea of a player moving teams so that ‘he’ can win a cup…Stick with the team you’re on, and don’t go chasing that personal goal in a team sport…..Run to a team to try to get a Cup and I think you’re a douche. Doesn’t matter who you are.”
    ————–

    No disrespect of your opinion, yet there may be another way to look at people that chase ultimate goals in their respective professions – that were perhaps life time goals since childhood…and it may be difficult to consider Jarome Iginla or Ray Bourque as…”Douch*s”

    Jarome Iginla chose to be traded to Pittsburgh instead of Boston, obviously because he felt he had a better chance to win a Stanley Cup. (Right choice? Who knows, we’ll see…)

    Did he do it for the Money?
    Iginla’s Career Earnings now stand at $69,025,000 and counting.
    http://www.hockeyzoneplus.com/salaries/1700

    Playing almost 2 more months of tough, brutal playoff hockey brings “Relative” small financial rewards to the winners and even the 1st Round losers.

    *The new 2013 CBA has DOUBLED the money for player’s playoff shares.

    This year, and assuming there will be 25 Shares to be divided, here is what each player will earn above his Contract Salary that is only paid during the season: (no typos here)
    1st Round losers: $10K
    2nd Round losers: $20K
    3rd Round losers: $50K
    Cup Finalist: $90K
    Cup Winner: $150K
    http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/bonus-money-adds-incentive-to-nhl-playoffs/

    As for Ray Bourque, he had little to prove, and if he had retired at the age of 39 before moving on to Colorado, he was still going to be a 1st Ballot Hall of Fame selection:
    - Fourth most Norris Trophy wins with 5, behind only the great Bobby Orr with 8 consecutive wins, and all time great Hab Doug Harvey and Nicky Lindstrom with 7 each.
    - 13 times on the 1st All Star Team – 6 times on the 2nd, and so much more…

    I don’t know If Bourque needed the money, yet his NHL contract career earnings only show a total of $32M with that last year at Colorado at $5.5M.

    Perhaps Bourque had an incredible and burning desire to win a Cup – to hoist in front of family and friends – to accomplish a life time goal being a Quebecois and watching the almost yearly Cup Parades – to be part of a Winner, yet more importantly, to be an INTEGRAL part of that Stanley Cup win.

    Was he?
    21 games played, 4 goals, 10 points, +9… which was 2nd best on the team and best for all Colorado Dmen, and an average of 28:32 minutes played per game….and perhaps the reason why Captain Joe Sakic passed the Cup to him first – even before Patrick Roy had a chance to hoist it a 2nd time with the Avalanche.
    That says a lot about Raymond Bourque!

  17. Howdumbcanube says:

    Keep rebuilding with Depth, Grit, and overall skill and we’ll be OK

  18. Timo says:

    These walks down the memory lane get sadder and sadder every year. Would really be nice to have something more recent to remember than stuff that happened 2 decades ago.

  19. Drew42 says:

    I actually met Marty last year at a charity fundraiser here in Vancouver, and had a chance to chat with him (obviously once i mentioned I was a Habs fan the playoff series came up). He told me the reason why they knew which exact stick had an illegal curve on it was because they had dragged the entire Kings stick rack down the hall and measured each stick themselves during intermission, this was in itself not above board) as they had told the Forum security guard on duty to take a walk….

    That same security guard came clean to Marty at a later date due to guilt of abandoning his post.
    So yes all may be fair game in the playoffs to win, but it still doesn’t sit to well with my morals.

    _______________________________________________
    “I got to get the Swede, eh?” – Saku Koivu

  20. The Chicoutimi Cucumber says:

    I was in the Forum that night. Never have you seen a crowd as depressed as that one was, trailing by a goal with a couple of minutes to go and looking at heading back to LA down 0-2. When they went for the stick call, I cursed them from standing room, sure it was a desperate gamble that would fail. Then, when Demers pulled Roy on the PP – a gusty, all-in move for which I will always respect him – I cursed them for giving the Kings an open net to shoot at without fear of icing. And then when Desjardinis scored, I experienced the single most radical mood swing of my life, from total dismay to total jubilation in a split second. It was absolute bedlam, strangers hugging and jumping up and down, beer flying, guys racing ecstatically up and down the corridors…we all knew the game was won in that moment. Sure enough, we won in OT like always, on a howitzer from Desjardins no less.

    Ya shoulda been there.

    Single greatest game of my life as a fan, and one of the all-time classic games in Canadiens history. A shame that it never entered the canon of legendary hockey games the way it should have done; I guarantee you that if the Leafs had done it every hockey fan alive would know the story of the McSorley Stick.

  21. habsfan0 says:

    $56 for a seat at the 1993 Stanley Cup Final.
    I wonder how much that seat,at the same location at the Bell Centre,would have cost at the 2013 Final?

    $56 probably wouldn’t be enough for a couple of beers IMHO.

    • The Chicoutimi Cucumber says:

      Don’t forget the long-lost phenomenon of standing room. For the cheapest ticket in the place ($12 regular season) you could stand right behind the reds. For young guys like I was back then, the trade off (sore feet) was no problem at all. Those were really the tail end of an era when live NHL hockey was actually accessible to everybody.

    • BJ says:

      I remember paying .75 cents (thats right) for standing room behind the then orange seats (highest up at the time). Those were jacked up to $1.25 for the playoffs much to our dismay.

      • Habfan17 says:

        Standing room was $8 when I was in my late teens going to games. It was great standing behind the reds! Sometimes people would leave early and we would try to sneak into their seats. The ushers were hard to get past though

        Habfan17

    • Whatever says:

      If I remember correctly, standing room for this playoff game was $16. I think I paid around $40 from a scalper outside Atwater station.

  22. Mattyleg says:

    Morning tout le monde,
    Had a quick look over yesterday’s thread, and I have to reiterate that I dislike the idea of a player moving teams so that ‘he’ can win a cup.

    It’s a team game, not an individual one. Is it right for players to hog the puck so that ‘they’ can score the winning goal? Of course not. I agree with the take on Ray Bourque (apart from the ‘riding the coat-tails’ bit), the idea that a player ‘deserves’ to win the Stanley Cup because of their individual talent is idiotic. No one player ‘deserves’ to win the Cup, only teams do.

    I don’t imagine that anyone honestly thinks that a player’s skill is diminished by the fact that they haven’t won a cup. Peter Stastny, Marcelle Dionne, Pat Lafontaine, Adam Oates, Dale Hawerchuck. I don’t think anyone can honestly say that Shawn Thornton or Craig Adams or Steve Rooney, with their Cup rings, are better than any of those players.

    Stick with the team you’re on, and don’t go chasing that personal goal in a team sport.

    And for those of you who say “any of us would do that,” you’re wrong. And it’s silly of you to think you can speak for everyone. For me, it’s always been ‘team’ first.

    Run to a team to try to get a Cup and I think you’re a douche. Doesn’t matter who you are.

    —Hope Springs Eternal—

    • ed says:

      it is always team first. and almost every pro athlete in a team sport would agree with you.

      where they would disagree however, is that their `team“ can actually change from year to year, and it often does change a few times during virtually every long career.

      if you speak frankly to a pro hockey player, he will usually open up and explain that his “loyalty“ is determined by the team he is playing for in the present tense.

      whereas fans stay loyal to the “team“ no matter who the players are, changing year after year, the players are playing this game under contract to try and help their current team win.

      so when a player like Bourque moves to the Avs, even the Bruins management stated publicly that they knew of and understood Bourque`s motives.

      I don`t remember anyone thinking that Bourque was a “douche“.

      He moved to a new team. He signed a contract for the new team. He knew they were an outstanding team and they had a great chance – nothing guaranteed, far from it – to win the Cup.

      Then he went out and played his usual fantastic game, and helped his new team win the Cup.

      I don`t think you could find too many people who would call Bourque a “douche“ for doing what he did.

      • Habfan17 says:

        Hi Ed, Like the post. To add to it, if a team tells a player they will do everything to build a cup contending team so he signs with them, and then the player does everything to help that happen, including taking home town discounts and then the team decides to either rebuild or to not spend to the cap and are now not going to be competative for years, why can’t the player move on to where they have a better chance? If the window of opportunity is now 2 maybe 3 seasons at best and you never know about an injury, and the team they committed to for many years now has changed direction, I have no problem with them moving

        I understand if all players only went where they wanted, half the teams would not exist or be competative. I do have a problem with players entering the league, demanding where they will or won’t play. The business model does not allow for this kind of “free” enterprise.

        Habfan17

    • Lafleurguy says:

      Hello? Matty? You there? Not your usual sense of humor. I agree with a lot of what Normand and you stated. But then, in the case of free agents choosing a team, isn’t the best or at least good chance of winning entered into their choice of teams? It’s a subjective dynamic in which a team wants to honour an aging stalwart and iconic player. Here’s a list of number of Cups won by the Original Six, and it’s surprising how few times the Bruins won.

      Montreal 24
      Toronto 13*
      Detroit 11
      Boston 5
      Chicago 4
      NY Rangers 4

      “May you live in interesting times.”
      *includes wins by Toronto St. Pats, and Toronto Arenas

    • HabinBurlington says:

      The Cup Rings do play a role in how players are remembered, and do alter their ranking as a player. However, this doesn’t mean Shawn Thornton is considered better than Marcel Dionne. What it means is when players careers are completed and they have similar styles and points to another player, often people point to the Cup Winner as having that intangible which makes them better.

      I don’t 100% subscribe to this theory, but I would be lying to you if I didn’t say it does at time sway me.

      In a different sport it has become almost the single largest YardStick when discussing who was or is the greatest NFL Quarterback. I for example think Dan Marino is in the top 3 of all time, even ahead of my beloved Terry Bradshaw. BUt Bradshaw has 4 rings while Marino has none, and often times people will discuss the greats and put Bradshaw ahead of Marino.

      A player has every right to chase their dream of a title, the difference for me is if they quit on their original team and force a trade or create discomfort in the locker room. I certainly wish Marino had gotten a chance outside of Miami, but alas he didn’t. He stayed loyal as you would like him to, but it has cost him the chance to be considered best QB ever.

      • Lafleurguy says:

        Roger Staubach? John Elway? Bob Griese? Steve Young? Joe Montana? Johnny Unitas? Bart Star? Y.A. Tittle? Brett Favre? Troy Aikman? Fran Tarkenton? (<—a personal favorite of mine).

        "May you live in interesting times."

    • Old Bald Bird says:

      Teams show no loyalty (eg Koivu and many others). They do what they think is best after weighing everything. There’s no reason why players should not do the same. I am pretty sure it’s not an easy decision and that some would decide to stay and some would go.

  23. Ozmodiar says:

    Anyone else hearing that Dallas might be interested in reuniting Cole and DD?

    40th pick in the draft might be in play …

    /waits for E.k.l.u.n.d to post the rumour

  24. HabinBurlington says:

    Tim Thomas apparantly considering playing hockey next season, and in shocking news I agree with Brian Burke’s latest idea for change in the NHL.

    http://www.torontosun.com/2013/06/02/nhl-notes-tim-thomas-thinking-of-comeback

    • habsfan0 says:

      Widening NHL rinks would mean eliminating a large number of revenue producing seats,a concept which would be anathema to NHL owners.

      • Luke says:

        Well, if they pulled out 2 rows (ofr example), prices would get bumped up row by row until it was only the final two rows in the arena were removed, from a pricing standpoint.
        Plus they’d also just increase the cost of tickets by 4.8% instead of 2.7% (or whatever) there were planning that year.

        • HabinBurlington says:

          If indeed the game became better to watch, and if by chance injuries were reduced. I think the increase TV revenue, the cost savings to teams from injuries would level it out. Pro Sports are now considered entertainment, if indeed that is what it is about, you owe it to yourselves to provide the best entertainment possible. With that can be justified increases in costs.

          As we see bands touring the worlds with elaborate stages to increase the entertainment value of the concert, this comes with higher ticket costs.

          The question remains, would the bigger rink, or a hybrid size between todays NHL rink and today’s int’l rink be a better product?

  25. commandant says:

    Emile Poirier, #52 on the board. A left wing with Gatineau.

    http://lastwordonsports.com/2013/06/03/emile-poirier-2013-nhl-draft-player-profile-52/

    Go Habs Go!
    Your 2013 NHL Draft Headquarters, Now Open.
    http://lastwordonsports.com/

  26. Habfan10912 says:

    “It was just hard to gauge,” Crosby said. “Interference calls where you barely catch a guy, and then you’re allowing punches to the head. Are we going to play, or are we going to call those little things once in a while? It’s hard to get a temperature on the game when that stuff is going on. Then you let a few of those go and everything starts getting out of hand.”

    When the best player in the game points out what the rest of us have witnessed through the recent years will it cause the league to get it’s act together? We’ll find out tonight.

    • Cal says:

      Hey, Jim. Not with Colon Campbell still gainfully employed by the NHL. It’s a big reason why fans are getting turned off. The refereeing is the joke of the major leagues.

      • HabinBurlington says:

        I get a real kick out of how the broadcasters the other day showed the Colon watching his son’s Bruins game and how relieved he must be that he no longer rules on the suspensions etc… Given he is still the boss of that office does not remove him from influencing how Brendan Shanahan distributes his B.S. Rulings.

      • Todays - Topic says:

        If fans are getting turned off. Why do they keep coming back. Some players are whiners and the league won’t pay attention to one or two.

        • Cal says:

          Show me another league that suspends its rules for championship playoffs? There isn’t one.
          What’s the purpose of their rulebook if their arbiters are told to forget the rulebook “because it’s the playoffs.”
          Imagine the howling if suddenly umps were told to expand the strike zone “because it’s the playoffs.”
          No fouls in basketball “because its the playoffs.”

          The NHL’s rules “committee” is a bleeping joke, making the NHL the biggest joke in Major League sports.

    • Dust says:

      Crosby was being a whiner during the game and from the sounds of it… after the game too. Those refs were equally bad for both teams. I couldn’t believe that inbetween periods crosby went after rask, while rask was skating to the bench to leave for intermission. Talk about taking a huffy fit cause you couldn’t score on him.

      • Kooch7800 says:

        Did you watch the game? I don’t like either team but you could easily see the Pens were getting screwed. The Ref’s were a joke.

        The Pens lost though because they were not playing their game and were letting emotions get out of hand.

        Happens to the habs against boston all the time and it happened the habs vs ottawa series in game 3. Ref’s didn’t call the game properly and everything got out of control

        “Keep your stick on the Ice”

  27. habstrinifan says:

    Regardless of if you follow closely or not, Heats and Ind. playing one game winner takes all CUP FINAL. Next round is gonna be like when we beat Boston and advanced to meet NYR. Anti climactic. Just a party really.

    • Habfan10912 says:

      Seventh games in any sport are special indeed. I wonder who the City of Cleveland will be rooting for? :)

    • HabinBurlington says:

      Interesting sidebar, when the Raptors traded T.J. Ford to Indiana for a burgeoning veteran Jermaine O’Neal, they included their 17th pick in the first round. That pick became Hibbert he of the impact on and off the court. Perhaps the current mayor of Toronto would have been Hibberts biggest supporter.

    • Dust says:

      Are you kidding me. The winner plays the Spurs. The Spurs are to basketball what Detroit is to hockey. Always good.
      No matter what it will be a good final

      • HabinBurlington says:

        Could the Spurs be having too much time off between series though? I would love to see Duncan add one more Championship ring to his repertoire. A classy player his entire career, including his time as a Demon Deacon.

      • habstrinifan says:

        I understand the Spurs are a good sound NBA team and by all measurements are a good team… but this titanic battle between the Heats/Ind gonna leave the winner not ‘bruised and battered’ as is often the case.. but like the HABS in ’79 simply too confident and ready for the ‘last hurdle’, with all the ‘foot soldiers’ ready to help the main players. On the other hand you could be 100 right.

  28. habstrinifan says:

    “I’d love to use an illegal stick,” Kirk Muller said. “I’d love to go out there and let go with those big, booming shots. It’s against the rules, though, just like hooking and tripping.”

    :)

  29. filincal says:

    93′ finals, Game 2 is probably still my favorite game of all time. That’s still the climax of my career as a “Hab Fan”.

  30. Habfan10912 says:

    Good morning Guy, Burl, Ian, Cal, Trini and those hidden behind the screen!
    Illegal sticks? How bout that one Chara yields. I know he was granted an exemption but the relationship to his bod to stick ratio looks a lot different then other players. A liberal or shall I say a Jerry Jacob’s stick ruling for Chara.

  31. habstrinifan says:

    Good morning everyone!

    Maybe cause the ‘missing habs’ are beginnin but Iam soaking in 1993 revisit.

  32. HabinBurlington says:

    On the previous thread, the discussion of players who had longtime careers with one team, join another and finally get their Stanley Cup Championship was discussed.

    I don’t think anyone can fault a player for going to another team if indeed it provides an opportunity for that player to win the Cup. A player I wish this could have happened for was our former captain Koivu. My only preference would be that it happen with a Western Conference team.

    And a few players whom I thought deserved to win a Cup but never did were Marcel Dionne, Gilbert Perrault and Ducky. (Dale Hawerchuk)

  33. HabinBurlington says:

    Good Morning All!

    Scott Burnside with a case for starting Fleury in net in game 2. I personally was advocating that the Penguins start Fleury in game 1. At the end of the day, I think when Fleury is playing well he is better than Vokoun. I thought that giving Fleury a clean slate in game 1 was a chance for him to start over, all the while the Penguins would have had Vokoun available as confident backup whom they could go to should Fleury struggle.

    http://espn.go.com/nhl/playoffs/2013/story/_/id/9335138/a-change-goal

    • Lafleurguy says:

      Gr….
      Ga….
      Goo….
      Good Morning Burly 10912.

      Did you notice who was first on this thread?

      “May you live in interesting times.”

    • Ian Cobb says:

      Good morning Gerald and all!

      I do not see L.A. winning more than one game this round! And the Pens have to play their speed and shoot game, or the Neanderthals will take this series.
      Any team but the Bears!!! PLEASE!

      • HabinBurlington says:

        Yes, I am in the anybody but Bruins camp as well. I think a Chicago vs. Pittsburgh final would be a real treat, a final with speed and skill and nice compliment of grit.

    • Cal says:

      Hey, Burly. Vokoun stays in. Fleury is too erratic.
      Pens have to deliver cheap shots after the whistle just like the Gooins. You know, score a goal, crosscheck a Gooin in the face. That kind of thing. ;)

      • habstrinifan says:

        B’s is the champ at cheap shots. Wont work. Penns gotta simplify their game and rely on Crosby less like they did against NYI after early games. Spread their attack. I remember a game againt NYI which Penns lost.. Crosby Malkin had 18 shots… no other Penn more than 2.

    • habstrinifan says:

      Fleury is indeed a better goalie. Although I agreed with Vokoun for game #1… but should be Fleury now.


Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.